Bachelor courses

Description:

This is a course of lectures and seminars for MA and advanced BA students.

The course is an interdisciplinary project between the Faculty of Social Sciences, department of Comparative Politics and the Faculty of Law, and addresses the topic both from a legal and a social science perspective.

The lectures will be given by teachers from both faculties, as well as invited guests. The aim is to bring together students who share the same interest or constitutional matters in the conjunction between law and politics, but who rarely meet in the spaces created by the university.

The course introduces students to ongoing research on central aspects of
constitutional development and bring students up to date on the frontiers
of research and literature in the field, encourages active participation and
independent thinking in engaging with the issues, and provide a forum for
students to exchange ideas and reflections. Through this course the student
will gain an overview of the research literature on constitutionalism and the relationship between rule of law and democracy in Norway and compared with other countries. A constitution is an outcome of political activity, and at the same time it constitutes rules and arenas for politics, establishing the boundaries for all branches of the state, including the parliament, the central administrative apparatus and the courts. The students will engage with the main theoretical perspectives to understand the dilemmas involved in securing the rule of law in a modern state, and the checks and balances between the executive, the legislator and the courts. This is done though group work and engagement with art and film, in addition to guest lectures and seminars.

Language of teaching: English

ECTS Credits: 10,00

Start: Spring semester 2020

Course plan: here

Reading list: here

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Description:

This course aims to provide students with an understanding of the role of courts and judges in contemporary politics. The role of courts as political actors and arenas for political battles has increased significantly in the past decades, across geographical regions as well as policy areas. This has raised a range of controversies: Is it undemocratic to give more powers to the courts? Does it lead to government that is more accountable and respect for citizen’s rights? – Or are we moving towards a “juristocracy” where “politicians in robes” decide cases based on their own ideology? Who benefits from the increased judicialisation of politics? The course introduces the students to the central scholarly debates around the political role of courts, judicial behavior and judicial politics, and draws empirical examples from all regions of the world.

Language of teaching: English

ECTS Credits: 10,00

Start: Autumn semester 2020

Course plan: here

Reading list: here