Author Archives: Alida Steigler

Bergen Summer Research School

Details:

How can your research contribute to solving global challenges? How do you design, conduct and communicate research to stimulate social change? And how do you create actionable knowledge?

BSRS 2020 explores the interfaces between science, society and politics. Six parallel courses will focus on key global challenges, including climate change, energy transition, sustainable oceans, media & democracy, global food systems, and migrant health. Together with cross-cutting keynotes and social events, the courses will help 100 PhD candidates to develop skills to create actionable knowledge.

Call for application: November 1, 2019

Deadline: February 1, 2020

Study period: June 8-18, 2020

More information at: University of Bergen

Effects of Lawfare – Courts and law as battlegrounds for social change

Details:

The course offers an introduction to the debates on the potential and limits of law as an instrument of social change, and opportunities to engage with some of the foremost scholars in the field, and international research projects currently seeking better answers to these questions.

Credits (ECTS)
The full course yields 10 ECTS (participation, paper abstract, presentation and paper (4-6000 words)), the partial course yields 3 ECTS points (participation, paper abstract and presentation).

Call for application: January 2020

Study period: 12 August – 21 August 2020

Language of instruction: English

Course plan: here

Reading list: here

Here you will find useful teaching materials for courses as part of our Effects of Rights & Law project.

More information about the course program and admission at: University of Bergen


Previous PhD cources

2019. PhD-course Schedule and reading list

2017. PhD Course Schedule&reading list.

Teaching material for courses

Here you will find useful teaching materials for courses as part of our INTPART project.

Videos taken during Bergen Exchanges 2019:

Master courses

Description:

This is a course of lectures and seminars for MA and advanced BA students.

The course is an interdisciplinary project between the Faculty of Social Sciences, department of Comparative Politics and the Faculty of Law, and addresses the topic both from a legal and a social science perspective.

The lectures will be given by teachers from both faculties, as well as invited guests. The aim is to bring together students who share the same interest or constitutional matters in the conjunction between law and politics, but who rarely meet in the spaces created by the university.

The course introduces students to ongoing research on central aspects of
constitutional development and bring students up to date on the frontiers
of research and literature in the field, encourages active participation and
independent thinking in engaging with the issues, and provide a forum for
students to exchange ideas and reflections. Through this course the student
will gain an overview of the research literature on constitutionalism and the relationship between rule of law and democracy in Norway and compared with other countries. A constitution is an outcome of political activity, and at the same time it constitutes rules and arenas for politics, establishing the boundaries for all branches of the state, including the parliament, the central administrative apparatus and the courts. The students will engage with the main theoretical perspectives to understand the dilemmas involved in securing the rule of law in a modern state, and the checks and balances between the executive, the legislator and the courts. This is done though group work and engagement with art and film, in addition to guest lectures and seminars.

Language of teaching: English

ECTS Credits: 10,00

Start: Spring semester 2020

Course plan: here

Reading list: here

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Description:

This is a course of seminar discussions, guest lectures and group work. The course offers an introduction to the debates on the potential and limits of law as an instrument of social change, and opportunities to engage with international research projects currently seeking better answers to these questions and will include guest lectures by prominent scholars. The course will be offered at irregular intervals.

Language of teaching: English

ECTS Credits: 10,00

Start: Spring semester 2021

Course plan: here

Reading list: here

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Description:

This is a course of literature seminars and workshop/writing seminars. Across the globe, democracy is challenged in ways that challenge the scholarly literature on democratic development. Breaking Bad: Understanding Backlash Against Democracy is a graduate research seminar focusing on theoretical and empirical analyses of the state of democracy in the world today, with a particular emphasis on new democracies in the global south. The graduate course project aims to develop a rigorous empirical basis for understanding the scope, causes, responses to and effects of the backlash against democracy. The course is structured around four distinctive democratic rights clusters, contestation rights, associational rights, gender rights and rule of law (judicial independence). To each rights dimension, we will present and discuss central theoretical arguments and empirical applications. The course is offered at irregular intervals.

Language of teaching: English

ECTS Credits: 10,00

Start: Spring semester 2021

Course plan: here

Reading list: here

Bachelor courses

Description:

This is a course of lectures and seminars for MA and advanced BA students.

The course is an interdisciplinary project between the Faculty of Social Sciences, department of Comparative Politics and the Faculty of Law, and addresses the topic both from a legal and a social science perspective.

The lectures will be given by teachers from both faculties, as well as invited guests. The aim is to bring together students who share the same interest or constitutional matters in the conjunction between law and politics, but who rarely meet in the spaces created by the university.

The course introduces students to ongoing research on central aspects of
constitutional development and bring students up to date on the frontiers
of research and literature in the field, encourages active participation and
independent thinking in engaging with the issues, and provide a forum for
students to exchange ideas and reflections. Through this course the student
will gain an overview of the research literature on constitutionalism and the relationship between rule of law and democracy in Norway and compared with other countries. A constitution is an outcome of political activity, and at the same time it constitutes rules and arenas for politics, establishing the boundaries for all branches of the state, including the parliament, the central administrative apparatus and the courts. The students will engage with the main theoretical perspectives to understand the dilemmas involved in securing the rule of law in a modern state, and the checks and balances between the executive, the legislator and the courts. This is done though group work and engagement with art and film, in addition to guest lectures and seminars.

Language of teaching: English

ECTS Credits: 10,00

Start: Spring semester 2020

Course plan: here

Reading list: here

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Description:

This course aims to provide students with an understanding of the role of courts and judges in contemporary politics. The role of courts as political actors and arenas for political battles has increased significantly in the past decades, across geographical regions as well as policy areas. This has raised a range of controversies: Is it undemocratic to give more powers to the courts? Does it lead to government that is more accountable and respect for citizen’s rights? – Or are we moving towards a “juristocracy” where “politicians in robes” decide cases based on their own ideology? Who benefits from the increased judicialisation of politics? The course introduces the students to the central scholarly debates around the political role of courts, judicial behavior and judicial politics, and draws empirical examples from all regions of the world.

Language of teaching: English

ECTS Credits: 10,00

Start: Autumn semester 2020

Course plan: here

Reading list: here